Observation – 3/25/2014 – Peak 6996, John F. Stevens Canyon, Glacier NP, Lewis Range

 

Observer Information

Date: 3/23/14

Time: 1500

Name: Jason Griswold/Brooke Timm

DAILY FIELD WEATHER SUMMARY

ZONE: Lewis Ranger/ Glacier NP

MT RANGE:

ELEV. RANGE: ~6500’

SKY

PRECIP

Type/Rate

Temperature

RIDGETOP WIND (mph) (actual or est)

HN24est @ Elev.

HS est @ Elev.

Trailbreaking/Riding Conditions

Skiing/Riding Quality

AM

PM

AM

PM

Hi

Low

Speed

Dir

4 cm

~310 cm

Approximately 4 cm new snow on established skin track. About 15 cm of easy trail braking off track.

Enjoyable boot top to knee deep powder

 

Intermitten breaking clouds

 

intermittent Light <1cm/ hr

1C

-2C

Calm- gusting 10mph

SE

                             

 

Weather Comments

SKY: Cloud cover, Trend, Timing:Mixed. Sunny and warm during ascent making for some sticky skinning on exposed upper East Ridge. Clouds rolled in while evaluating the pit.

 

PRECIP: Type/rate, Accumulation:Intermittent light snow later in the afternoon.

 

WIND: speed/direction/blowing snow: Winds mostly calm but picked up in late afternoon with gusts from SE of approximately 10 mph .

 

SNOWPACK AND AVALANCHE FACTORS

SNOW SURFACE: (crusts, soft snow, hard snow, dry, wet, sfc hoar) 4 cm new(24 hr) snow on top of recent storm cycle snow.

 

LAYERS OF CONCERN? We found a thin reactive layer of small (<1mm) decomposing facets approximately 70 cm from the surface - though it took hard force for it to fail. The column popped out on CT27 Q1 several centimeters above the early March rain/melt/freeze crust. A subsequent, but impromptu shovel shear had the column pop out directly above that crust at about 90 cm from the surface under moderate force.With the CT Q1 result, we thought we might see propagation in the ECT. No such luck, but we did get ECTN28 on that layer of decomposing facets.We also had ECTN results in some of the various recent storm cycle snow in the top 30 cm of surface snow

 

RECENT AVALANCHE ACTIVITY/OBSERVATIONS: None

 

STABILITY TEST? See above

 

COMMENTS:Lots of snow on the north aspect of Peak 6996 with over 3 meters at our chosen snow pit site (we were actually looking for a shallow spot but were fooled by some hidden terrain features).The gully of the “Big Run” is almost completely filled in – giving the area a much different feel. Skiing the same area on March 20th, I found some wind slab formation just below the summit that quickly dissipated within the first 200 vertical feet or so. On March 23, we did not notice any wind slab in our location.

 

 

 

Avalanche ObservationsNone

NUM

SIZE

LOC

TRIGGER

 

TYPE

INC

ASP

ELEV

COMMENTS:

(Est. Depth, Width, Failure Layer, Timing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 For a quick reference of snow profile notation click here.
For a full reference check Snow, Weather, and Avalanche Guidelines.